Thoughts on my 2014

2014 has come to an end and it’s time to look ahead to 2015. 2014 was my first full year in a professional environment. I wrote my first jQuery plugin. This was also the year I really sunk my teeth into CSS preprocessors, automation, and version control to supplement my front end development.

Working for a full year doing web development has been a great experience. I used to think the hardest thing in programming was what to name your variables, but it turns out that – for me – it’s communicating your ideas. Because of this this, I want to blog more in 2015. I think it’ll help me understand my thoughts a little more. The ability to communicate technical ideas clearly to a non-technical audience is a skill I need to sharpen.

I dove into jQuery a little more thanks to videos by Paul Irish. This knowledge allowed me to write my first jQuery plugin. It’s nothing super amazing or technical, but it was a neat exercise in learning something new. Looking at example code of jQuery plugins made me feel uncomfortable at first, but as I stuck with it and kept reading, it started to gel together enough for me to write something that works.

This is the year I started using LESS as my CSS preprocessor of choice. I keep reading a lot about Sass, but haven’t tried it out yet because LESS does everything I need. LESS solves many problems I was tired of dealing with while writing plain CSS – namely lack of variables and mixins. The idea of compiling a few .LESS files into 1 CSS file seemed to make more organizational sense to me, so I never looked back.

Another addition to my workflow in 2014 was embracing front end tooling. I used to have no issue importing 9 non-minified .js files in the footer of a site. I used to FTP all my files manually every time they were updated. I used to download external libraries by just going to the library’s website, downloading the zip, then extracting it to my project. Now, I use grunt tasks to concatenate and minify my scripts and CSS. I use rsync to transfer my project to staging or production servers. I use bower to manage my site’s dependencies, allowing me to quickly download and update external libraries. These things used to seem advanced and scary to learn, but since I’ve gotten to know these tools, I can’t imagine working without them.

Finally, 2014 was the year I started using version control. Git tutorials and YouTube videos really helped me understand how important it is to a developer’s workflow, how it works, and how to use this powerful tool to manage your projects. Gone is the fear that something irreversible will happen to my project. I can rest assured knowing each version is backed up on my local repo and in the hosted repo (I like using BitBucket).

TL;DR – My workflow changed a lot for the better in 2014, and I got the chance to learn more about jQuery plugins (and as a side effect I now understand JavaScript and jQuery better). Looking forward to 2015, I hope to learn as much or more.

What do you think?